Because I teach a lot, and love it. 

History 311:

History of the United States from Reconstruction to the Present

 

Online Course                                                     Robin Marie Averbeck, PhD         

Sacramento City College                                      Email: It's a secret! :D

Spring 2018      

 

This course explores the major problems and developments of American history from Reconstruction to the present. Due to the overwhelming amount of material to be covered in so short a time, the material will necessarily be selective, and this course will place a particular emphasis on political thought, class, and race.

 

NOTICE: For teaching this course, I will be paid about $3,500 dollars, with no benefits or health care, and without job security or the protections of tenure (such as academic freedom) originally intended, at its conception, to apply to all university instructors. These are the precarious conditions of the adjunct instructors that increasingly make up the majority of the college and university workforce.

 

WARNING: Do not take this course if you are assuming that an online course will require less effort and time commitment than a normal course. This is not the case. The amount of time spent listening to lectures and the amount of reading will be the same, and if you do not keep up with the course, your opportunities to complete assignments will pass, as they will close after a certain date. Students who are self-motivated and capable of setting a schedule typically do well in online courses; students who struggle with these skills will have a harder time. Make sure you are prepared to take on the commitments required to do well.

 

 

The Lay of the Land! (ie, content of the course)

 

COURSE LECTURES:

 

I will be posting one to two lectures each week, which you can watch on your own schedule. I recommend, however, that you set a schedule for yourself as you would a normal class, so as to increase the chances of you keeping up regularly with the material. The lectures will consist of videos available on YouTube with a Power Point slide show that will run with my narration over it. Not all lectures will be the exact same length; the long ones can be an hour and 40 minutes, and the shortest run just about 30 minutes (the most common length is likely to be an hour and 20 minutes). Make sure you pay attention to how long each lecture is so you budget your time accordingly.

 

Watching lectures is pivotal to this course: You will be expected to comment on the lecture content both in our weekly discussions (see below under Discussion Participation) and on your exam essays.

 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

 

PAPER – 30 Percent

 

There will be one paper in the course that will consist of writing a 3-4 page essay. This will be due the last day of the course.  

 

DISCUSSION PARTICIPATION – 50 Percent

 

Participation on the Discussion Board will make up the largest chunk of your grade, accounting for 50 percent of the final grade. Each week you will have to contribute to discussion about the reading material and the lecture material. The discussion question or questions will be posted every week on the “Discussion” page in Canvas. You must contribute at least one comment on the question(s) by the close of the week. The due date for these contributions will be posted on the Discussion Page and are listed below under each week.

 

There are three important things to note about participating in discussion:

 

1)     You will NOT be able to view other students’ discussion contributions until you yourself have added your contribution.

 

2)     Your initial contribution to discussion must be substantial and thoughtful. It must respond to the question(s) and be at least 400 words long. Your replies to other students can be shorter, but must indicate that you carefully read their contribution. Moreover, these contributions can be casual in tone, but have to be written in full, formal English; no texting speak!

 

A substantial and thoughtful contribution would NOT include “I agree with the author/other student” or “I’m not sure what I think.” You must have something to say, so you must really think about the reading & lectures until you have something to contribute.

 

3)     Finally, please be respectful of one another. It is fine to disagree but focus on the ideas and why you disagree with them and do not comment on a particular student personally. (So instead of saying, “you are stupid,” say, “I don’t agree with your position, because of x, y, and z.”) Any student who is disrespectful of other students will face disciplinary actions.

 

I will also be replying/participating in these discussion threads. My participation will mirror how I would mediate conversation in the classroom; I will not comment on every contribution, but will make corrections when necessary or draw students’ attention to some particularly thoughtful or useful discussion taking place. I will, however, be reading all contributions!

 

Rubric for grading discussion contributions available on Canvas.  

 

ATTENDANCE – Although this course is online, it is pivotal that you participate on a regular basis. If you miss 2 or more discussion sections in this course without a documented excuse, I will drop you from the course.

 

QUIZZES – 20 percent

 

There will also be weekly quizzes at the beginning of the week on the reading material from that week. These will be posted under the “Quizzes” page on Canvas and you will have at least 48 hours to complete them before they will be closed.

 

 

E-MAIL POLICY:

 

I will try to respond to e-mails as promptly as possible; however, I reserve the right to a weekend so there is no guarantee you will hear back from me during Friday or Saturday. In general though I encourage students to e-mail questions about the material and assignments.

 

I will be happy to look over rough drafts and answer questions about the paper, but only if the drafts and/or questions are sent 48 HOURS BEFORE THE DUE DATE & TIME. 

 

 

REQUIRED BOOKS:

 

Lemann, Nicholas, Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008).

Susan Ware, Title IX: A Brief History with Documents (Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press, Inc., 2007).

Textbook: As students and universities are currently being exploited by being required to buy ultra-expensive textbooks from publishers who regularly issue new editions in order to drive up costs, I am not assigning a physical textbook in this course but am rather utilizing the online, collaborative textbook The American Yawp.  Reading assignments will refer to the corresponding numbered segment, which you can see and click on at the homepage of The American Yawp (at http://www.americanyawp.com). 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

WEEK ONE

 

Lectures to view:

 

A Kind of Slavery: Reconstruction & Redemption

 

Readings:

 

The American Yawp, Segment 16, “Capital and Labor”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK TWO

 

Lectures to view:

 

Voices of Struggle: Black Intellectuals after the Civil War

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, A Note to the Reader + Prologue

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK THREE

 

Lectures to view:

 

“Eight Hours for What We Will”: Working-class Politics & Culture

Life Underground: Labor & Violence in Gilded Age America

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, Chapter 1 “Adelbert and Blanche”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK FOUR

Lectures to view:

The People’s Party: the Rise and Fall of Populism

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, Chapter 2 “Vicksburg Troubles”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK FIVE

 

Lectures to view:

 

The Elites Respond: Politics and Progressivism in Gilded Age America

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, Chapter 3 “The Peace Conference”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday, due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK SIX

 

Lectures to view:

 

Women for Political Democracy, Women for Industrial Democracy: Gender, Class and Politics in Gilded Age America

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, Chapter 4 “Revolution”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK SEVEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

“The Flapper & the Klanswoman: 1920s Popular Culture & Backlash”

 

Readings:

 

Lemann, Redemption, Chapter 5 “The Mississippi Plan”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK EIGHT

 

Lectures to view:

 

Hard Times: the Crash, the Depression & the New Deal

America in WWII: Gender & Race in Wartime

 

Reading:

 

The American Yawp, Segment 24, “World War II”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK NINE

 

Lectures to view:

 

An Affluent Society, a Cold War Culture: the New Post-War World

 

Reading:

 

Title IX, Introduction (1-27) + The Back Story: Documents 1 & 2 (35-47)

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK TEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

The Arc of History: the Civil Rights Movement

 

Reading:

 

Title IX, The Early Years of Title IX: Letter from Nancy D. Kruh (58-60), Sabock, “Football: It Pays the Bills, Son” (60-63), Joni Barnett and the Yale Women’s Crew, “Yale Women’s Crew Strips in Title IX Protest” (69-71), “Stalled at the Start” (71-74)

 

The American Yawp, Segment 26, “The Sixties”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday, at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK ELEVEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

The Times They Are A’ Changin’: the Social Movements of the 1960s

 

The &^!$ Hits the Fan: the Death of the 1960s

 

Reading:

 

Title IX, An Increasingly Polarized Debate: Cynthia Lee A. Pemberton, “One Woman’s Fight for Gender Equality in Sport” and all documents that follow (90-128).

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK TWELVE

 

Lectures to view:

 

Nixonland: The Beginning of Realignment  

 

Reading:

 

Title IX, Title IX and American Culture: all documents (129-168).

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK THIRTEEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

“Stayin’ Alive”: Class, Culture, and Politics in the 1970s

 

Reading:

 

The American Yawp, Segment 29, “The Triumph of the Right”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday, at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday, April 21 due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

WEEK FOURTEEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

The Rise of the New Right Part I: the Religious Right

The Rise of the New Right Part II: the Libertarian Right

 

Reading:

 

None due to increased lecture viewing load; quiz will be on lectures.

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.

 

 

WEEK FIFTEEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

A New Gilded Age?: The Rise of Inequality 

 

Reading:

 

The American Yawp, Segment 30, “The Recent Past”

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm..

 

WEEK SIXTEEN

 

Lectures to view:

 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration & the Politics of Colorblindness

 

Reading:

 

None; work on your papers!

 

Assignments:

 

Participation on Discussion Board due by Friday at 11:30pm.

Quiz will appear by 12:00pm on Thursday due by Sunday at 11:30pm.